Bayou Moon – Tom Newman – 1985

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Have you ever gotten fed up with the vague-orientalism of your standard New Age album? Have you ever listened to a Hearts of Space release and thought, “OK, I’m pretty sick of hearing about seasons, oceans, white people’s conception of ‘Africa,’ forests, and rain-forests. What other themes were they exploiting?”  Have you ever wanted to open a Reki tent in a Louisiana Swamp? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then Tom Newman’s Bayou Moon is for you.

Continuing the rich tradition of theme albums on New Age labels, Bayou Moon is a weird and wonderful take on Cajun, Blues, and Zydeco music. It combines the basic motifs of these genres with occasional moments of Berlin-School synthesis, reverb drenched guitars, ominous bass progressions, and  the occasional jaw-harp. The first track “Concerto De Mango in E-major” sounds someone tried to adapt Vangelis’ Antarctica (1983) for the bayou part of the Pirates of the Caribbean ride at Disneyland.

Brooding ambient tracks like “Moonrise” and “Straw Dogs” are excellent listening, but for me the upbeat and jangling track “Gumbo Fling” takes the proverbial cake [or gumbo].  Though I constantly grapple with my love of this kind of New Age music  and its issues of appropriation and essentialization [more on this in the  near future], Bayou Moon is quirky, refreshing, and adventurous in a that way many themed New Age albums aren’t. Side note, Tom Newman is incidentally the guy who produced Mike Oldfield’s classic album Tubular Bells.

This is the perfect album for your next paddle down the Mississippi, documentary on the everglades, or just sitting around in your living room. Enjoy!

Gumbo Fling I:

Concerto De Mango in E-major:

 

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Telectu -‎Camerata Elettronica -1988

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Telectu’s Camerata Elettronica sounds like Mark Mothersburg and Henry Cow  were asked to collaborate on a soundtrack for the film The Man With the Golden Arm.

This is a  noir-y album of experimental jazz composed using plastic-sounding synth approximations of standard jazz  instruments, samples of live instruments on a Roland-s10, and live instrumentation. The results are spectacular, bizarre, and still avant-garde by today’s standards.

Some musical relatives can be found on the weirder tracks off Frank Zappa’s Jazz From Hell (1986),  but Camerata Elettronica is far more raw and unhinged. The album’s post-modern logic is both jarring and endearing – there is a quota of artifice per every song. On some of the earlier tracks on the album you will hear live guitars and bass juxtaposed by thudding drum machines and synthetic saxophones, and on some of the later songs you will find the opposite.

Telectu was a duo formed in 1982 by guitarist Vítor Rua of the Portuguese rock band GNR [no, not Guns ‘n Roses]  and keyboardist Jorge Lima Barreto. Both Barreto and Rua are accomplished musicians who who have released a lot of experimental music that can be described as minimalist and improvisational. Most of it is not quite my bag, but this album really hits the spot.

Zingaro’s Tune:

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